Category: Electric Bicycle

iZip EZGO Folding Bicycle Spokes

imagesNeed rear spokes for your iZip EZGO? They are HARD TO FIND and expensive when you do. I am selling 10 for $10 plus shipping. They are 94mm in length, 13g. The bike calls for 93mm for the left and 94mm for the right, so you can use these on both sides and just trim the length. My iZip breaks spokes on the back with the small 16″ tire, no suspension and a hub mounted motor. I trued my wheel using this excellent guide and I quit breaking them regularly. Now I break them occasionally. It took a long time to true the wheel, but I did it using simple tools.

iZip EZGO spokes. You need ’em, I got ’em.

20160204_082835

Urban Riding and Mobility Challenges

Maintenance required
Maintenance required

Finding information about mobility and urban riding has not been easy for me. There has been a lot of learning by trial-and-error. I realize that it is a small segment of the population who share these interests and concerns, but I know there are people like me. That’s why I share what I am experiencing, so someone like me who is looking for information can find more information.

Recently someone in our community was using a wheelchair on our urban train and got their wheel caught in the tracks while crossing. Unfortunately a train was coming and he was struck and killed. Using mobility devices includes dangers, and for those of us who use them it is serious business.

Working on a new piece of safety equipment for myself right now. Once I get further along I will share. My friend and I came up with an idea and it’s been fun to try making it. We have ordered parts and will begin prototyping soon. I am excited.

Been continuing to ride and been thinking about how maintenance is a key element to factor with any device. This week I replaced a faulty throttle on my Trailz, so that is back on-line again. Found a broken rear spoke that needs replacing on my EZGO bicycle. And I need to make some decisions and move ahead with my battery configuration upgrade on my Lyric, or should I say eBikeboard, scooter. Got my first flat on the Lyric the other day, goathead sticker. They are brutal in the spots where the weeds have been left to grow. Also picked one up in the front tire of the EZGO, so two flat tires in one week. I run Schwalbe Marathon Plus tires with puncture protection, still got me.

With the weather changing, I am heading into the winter riding season, which can be some of the most challenging riding.

Bike Riding Lip Service

eZip at the soccer stadium
eZip at the soccer stadium

I live within a couple miles of the local soccer stadium and sometimes we ride in for games. When I am riding fast and over obstacles I like the bigger fatter tires of my 26″ eZip Trailz. The Trailz is one of the cheaper electric bikes made, but they made a lot of them and there is a lot of information and parts available.

Personally I like riding mine. I can get about 20 miles out of one battery pack. I changed the battery connection on mine to Anderson connectors so I can use the batteries on other vehicles as well. I changed the plastic pedals for some metal ones I picked up at a yard sale.

Riding in an urban environment is challenging for a number of reasons. There are many hazards. The road has screws, glass, stickers, curbs, holes, rocks, etc. The biggest danger is cars, there is no arguing with mass. But people who are not paying attention, people not expecting you to be there and people who think the road is for cars and not bikes, they are the biggest threats.

Every time I hear someone talking about taking public transportation and riding bicycles I chuckle. Do you really intend to ride or do you intend other people to ride? If you ride you know it’s nuts.

So here’s the perfect example about bicycle riding lip service. We rode our bicycles to the soccer game the other night. Over 20,000 seats. Do you know how many bicycle parking spots? 4. We used two.

Here’s the stats on my electric bicycle:

26″ Ezip Trailz Electric Bike:

  • Motor: 450W DC Brushed Earth Magnet
  • Ezip Trailz Electric Bike requires EV-rated, SLA-type, rear-rack mounted, 24V rechargeable battery (included)
  • E-bicycle requires 6-8 hours to charge battery completely
  • Charge System: UL-listed Currie Smart Charger with LED status display
  • Electric Bicycle Controller: exclusive Currie Electro-Drive TM 24V, fully-potted with power gauge function
  • Derailleur: Shimano rear
  • Grip Shift: SRAM
  • Shimano 7-speed freewheel
  • Ezip Electric Bike User Controls: power on/off switch, easy-access charger port in removable battery pack, twist throttle with PAS+TAG function and battery gauge
  • Maximum E-Bike Speed: 15 mph (rider weight, rider input and terrain contingent)
  • Range: 15-22 miles (rider weight, rider input and terrain contingent)
  • Wheels: 26″ alloy rims
  • Frame: exclusive Currie hi-ten steel frame with Bottle Bosses, fender and rack mounts
  • Fork Type: suspension
  • Handlebars: mid-rise bar and stem
  • Saddle: comfort design with quick-release seat post
  • Brakes: alloy linear pull with alloy brake-inhibit lever
  • Maximum Weight Capacity: 240 lbs
  • Dimensions: 54″L x 18″W x 48″H

 

Post Two : What To Ride

Quazar 36v 350W
Quazar 36v 350W

When it came to mobility, I quickly realized I didn’t even know what questions to ask. After many mistakes and much wasted time and effort, I found the question: With a seat — how fast, how far? What I found is I need to ride 3 speeds; walking speed (3-4 mph), running speed (4-8 mph), and city transport speed (12-15 mph). So basically shopping, riding with my wife while she runs, and zipping to the store in town.

A Pride GoGo mobility scooter can give you lots of walking speed — only. An inexpensive electric scooter can give you running speed, and an electric bicycle can get you all the speed you are looking for. There is a tool for each job.

So how far? My kick scooter; .5 to 1 mile (slow); My eZip 750 (8 miles 12-15 mph); my iZip EZGO 16″ folding bicycle (15 miles at 6 mph); and my eZip Trailz (12-15 mph for 20 miles).

What about something that can do it all? If you can balance, a 2 wheeled electric scooter is tough to beat. They can go fast or slow and can be ridden in stores. Currie has stopped making their 750w and 1000w scooters which is the smallest I would recommend for an adult, but you can find them used. There are other manufacturers making 2 wheeled scooters with a seat. I recently picked up a 36v Quazar scooter that is belt driven.

I had a 3-wheeled Dillenger M5 that could do it all. 350w 36v12ah, it could go over 10 miles at speeds of up  to 18 mph. No rear suspension, it was fun to ride and surprisingly stable. Limited hill climbing ability though.

My best ride is my Lyric Runn3r. Full suspension, all aluminum body, speed, torque, brakes, lights, speedometer, quality tires, fenders, alarm, remote — it has it all. 48v 500w motor. It even has a speed selector so I can set the speed. Example, riding in a store I set the speed selector to low so the starts are not full-jerks. I have much finer throttle control. At high speed it is great, the tilting suspension allows me to lean into turns and take them at higher speeds. Controller is sealed, so riding this in the winter; snow, rain, whatever — no problem.

I try to ride my electric bicycles when I can. I like at least getting some exercise when possible. But on bad pain days it is nice to have the full electric options.

Post One

Lyric Scooter-4

This site is for people who use mobility devices. I started using scooters when my body gave out and what I quickly realized was information about the devices I needed was not easily obtained. It was hard to understand what devices would truly serve my needs, and I needed affordable solutions.

To that end, I have bought (and sold) many scooters trying to find the correct solutions for me. I have started this website to share what I have found.

I currently have a stable of bicycles, electric bicycles, electric scooters and kick scooters that I use in my daily life. Keeping them running has taught me how to repair and customize mobility devices. Using and traveling with mobility devices has taught me how they work in the real world, in the wild.

Life is ahead of me. I can’t worry about what I can’t do, I have to focus on what I want to do and find the way to get it done.